The Die is Now Cast: Essex County’s Political and Military Response to the Intolerable Acts

The Die is Now Cast: Essex County’s Political and Military Response to the Intolerable Acts

In December 1773, a mob of Boston residents stormed three merchant ships moored at Griffin’s Wharf and quickly destroyed the chests of East India Company tea located onboard. Three months later, in response to the Boston Tea Party, Parliament passed a series of laws known as the Boston Port Bill. These legislative acts essentially stripped Massachusetts colonists of their constitutional, economic, and political rights.

Nicknamed the “Intolerable Acts” by New Englanders, the passage of these punitive laws pushed Massachusetts, including the colonists of Essex County, to the brink of war.

Join historian Alexander Cain as he explores Essex County’s political and constitutional responses to the Intolerable Acts and the steps the colonists of the county took to prepare for war with England after reconciliation became impossible.

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This program is part of Essex County Revolution 250.
Essex County Revolution 250 is an initiative of Essex Heritage in partnership with Massachusetts Rev250 and dozens of regional museums, heritage sites, and organizations, with the intention of raising awareness and highlighting the diverse stories of Essex County, Massachusetts residents, free and unfree, during the American Revolutionary period. For more information visit essexheritage.org/rev250

Meredith Farm is a privately owned, 188 acre farm in Topsfield, which has been recently renovated. It’s 1793 Barn houses an extensive private collection of artifacts related to American history.

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